Fat Head (2009)

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Morgan Spurlock created a documentary (Super Size Me) that played on all the gullibilities of the left: people aren't responsible for their own actions, evil corporations that offer larger sodas and fries with their meals are why people get fat. One of the 3 people that debunked it was Tom Naughton, by going on an all-fast-food diet (mainly McDonald's), but he keeps his calories to around 2,000 and his carbohydrates to around 100 grams per day, and after a month eating that way he loses 12 pounds and his total cholesterol goes down. Basically, the exact opposite of Spurlock, by still eating only at McD's, but being intelligent about it. (e.g. "it's not the restaurant it's your food choices you dolt").

Facts

I think Naughton was partly motivated when he asked Spurlock for a food log or something to replicate the experiment -- and Spurlock wouldn't provide it. That alone smells like bullshit. And it turns out Spurlock left out a key omission all along: he was a chronic alcoholic (and sex offender) that when he went off the sauce, and his shakes, liver problems, and other symptoms were most likely due to alcohol withdrawal than fast food. None of the reviewers or places that loved it, and repeated the disinformation against McD's was interested in the facts and correcting their mistakes. (That would look like Journalism).

They also had much less interest in promoting Naughton's Documentary on equal grounds, despite it being more interesting and factually correct.

Soso Whaley also copied the all McD's diet for a month and, "I lost 10 pounds (going from 175 to 165) and lowered my cholesterol from 237 to 197, a drop of 40 points." Of course she maintained her caloric intake at around 2,000 per day, exercised regularly and did not insist on consuming more food than she otherwise would.

John Cisna, a high school science teacher, lost 60 pounds while eating exclusively at McDonald's for 180 days.

So the summary was Fat Head was like Super Size Me, only more factual and less left-wing-polemic. So it got less support from the reviewers, Hollywood and the media, that preferred comforting lies to uncomfortable truths.

Reviewers

This Documentary was like Super Size Me, only more scientific and would help more people. So it was snubbed by reviewers completely. Not one that loved Super Size Me, wanted to correct the record. But audiences loved it (77%) -- that even more than Super Size Me (72%). So this -77 (0/77) spread is even more significant, because anyone with journalism in their background would want to get the truth out their, especially if they got it wrong the first time.

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Reviewer Bias

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Morgan Spurlock created a documentary that played on all the gullibilities of the left. People aren't responsible for their own actions, evil corporations that offer larger sodas and fries with their meals are why people get fat. (Not the lack of exercise or their own actions). In this case targeting an all MacDonalds diet. It was the perfect blend of anti-corporatism and dodging of personal responsibility -- and was an immediate hit. Only it was all a fraud, debunked by many others that ate exclusively and McD's and got healthier. And it turns out he left out a key omission all along: he was a chronic alcoholic (and sex offender) that likely went off the sauce, and his shakes, liver problems, and other symptoms were most likely due to alcohol withdrawal. But other than it being a complete fraud, by a drunk sex-offender, it was great. more...

Conclusion

If you listen to liberal documentaries, you get dumber and think the world is out to get you. The truth is, some people lie for publicity. And the easiest lies to tell are against those who believe in collectivism (following the herd), and who are young, un-skeptical, and think all corporations are evil, and individuals are mindless victims of whatever dogma they see on TV (like they are).

But we learn through the counter-points, that if you take personal responsibility, you become a better person, even if you only eat at McDonalds.

References