Difference between revisions of "Think like a Freak"

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<includeonly>[[Image:think-like-a-freak.jpg|right|48px]]I love the Freakanomics books and podcast. A lot of it is confirmation bias: I already think like a freak (much of the time), so most of their stories were snippets of things I'd read, or ways that I try to approach problems, or ways I like to think. But reminding me of all the unintended consequences, and remembering to solve the right problem, just makes me happy. It's easy to get in ruts, or think small, like answering people's questions -- instead of stopping, pausing, asking what they REALLY are trying to get to, and answering that instead.
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</includeonly><noinclude>[[Image:think-like-a-freak.jpg|right]]I love the Freakanomics books.
A relatively unknown and failing author and Socialist by the name of Upton Sinclair wanted to write a political propaganda book, so he went under cover in 1904 in Chicago meat packing plants, and by 1906 he completed his semi-fictional hit piece called, "The Jungle". While it was completely debunked at the time, it's still taught in schools today.
 
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I love the Freakanomics books.
 
  
 
A lot of it is confirmation bias: I already think like a freak (much of the time), so most of their stories were snippets of things I'd read, or ways that I try to approach problems, or ways I like to think. But reminding me of all the unintended consequences, and remembering to solve the right problem, just makes me happy. It's easy to get in ruts, or think small, like answering people's questions -- instead of stopping, pausing, asking what they REALLY are trying to get to, and answering that instead.
 
A lot of it is confirmation bias: I already think like a freak (much of the time), so most of their stories were snippets of things I'd read, or ways that I try to approach problems, or ways I like to think. But reminding me of all the unintended consequences, and remembering to solve the right problem, just makes me happy. It's easy to get in ruts, or think small, like answering people's questions -- instead of stopping, pausing, asking what they REALLY are trying to get to, and answering that instead.

Latest revision as of 09:27, 7 April 2019

Think-like-a-freak.jpg

I love the Freakanomics books.

A lot of it is confirmation bias: I already think like a freak (much of the time), so most of their stories were snippets of things I'd read, or ways that I try to approach problems, or ways I like to think. But reminding me of all the unintended consequences, and remembering to solve the right problem, just makes me happy. It's easy to get in ruts, or think small, like answering people's questions -- instead of stopping, pausing, asking what they REALLY are trying to get to, and answering that instead.

I was going to write a review, and explain what it was about, but Laura Shin @ Forbes did a more detailed synopsis than I was going to write. But with this book, it's the journey (not the destination). Just listen to the stories and let your mind wander on all the times you've done/seen things similar (both on the smart side, and the not-so-freakish side).

This was the opposite of TL;DR, it was TS;OTQ (Over too quickly).

Written: 2015.04.20